House Special: December 2020

 House Special: December 2020


This marks both my last post for the year, as well as rounding off the House Specials for the whole year. It will soon be 2021, plus my one- year bloggiversary. To start off 2021, I am collaborating with Miss Woodhouse over at Notes from a Heartfield Girl to bring you a month long Marvel Cinematic Universe blogathon. Look for the announcement on both blogs before the end of the year. For today, I'm giving you ten characters from classic Christmas stories. There will be SPOILERS down the line. Happy reading!






~ Number Ten ~

Olaf

Olaf's Frozen Adventure

House: Hufflepuff

I'd thought I'd start out with the least traditional of the bunch. I'm taking from the Holiday Frozen special that was released a few years ago, specifically for Christmas. Plus, Olaf is a snowman, which is very Christmas-y. One of his defining traits is loving warm hugs, which is staple for almost every Hufflepuff. He's warm, caring, happy, energetic, and just in general loves everybody. He's also very concerned with how the world works, but, more importantly, how those events effect his friends and others around him. 





~ Number Nine ~

Buddy

Elf

House: Gryffindor

This character was recommended by Movie Critic over at Movies Meet Their Match. To be honest, I watched the movie for the first time this year, as I've never gotten around to it otherwise. I wasn't disappointed by this little Christmas gem. So, it's natural to wonder why he's placed in Gryffindor, since he's a lot like Olaf in many ways. I actually had to think about this for a long time. Eventually, I came to this conclusion because Buddy is extremely fearless. He leaves the only home he's ever known to visit New York City, which is jarring, to say the least. But he's also not afraid to shout how he loves everyone, tell the truth, or be so confident in walking around a massive city all by himself. What truly cements it is when he bursts into his father's busy office and loudly shout that he's in love, and doesn't care who knows. Only Gryffindors can be this bold. 





~ Number Eight ~

George Bailey

It's a Wonderful Life

House: Hufflepuff

This was also suggested by Movie Critic. This is a timeless tale for a reason, never failing to make people cry, or, in my case, bawl like a baby. George Bailey seems kind of cynical on the outside, wanting nothing more in his life then to leave his small town behind and see the world. Events throughout his life keep happening, though, that keep him in his hometown, while friends and family go off and do great things. However, as we see, literally none of that was possible without George and his selfless act of putting others needs before his own desires. Hufflepuffs are known for their hard work and loyalty, which describes George to a "T". He saves his brother at the cost of losing his hearing, and takes over his father's business at the cost of seeing the world. 





~ Number Seven ~

Phil Davis

White Christmas 

House: Slytherin 

Bing Crosby often gets most of the spotlight in White Christmas, which is understandable. However, for this list, I'll focus on his counterpart Davis, the other half of their musical. And I noticed something on my most recent re- watch. Davis stutters a lot when uncomfortable, or put under unexpected pressure, but he is a master manipulator. For ten years, he was able to drag Wallace around as they became famous, then thinks three steps ahead when trying to set his friend up with Betty. On that note, I want to say that Judy was absolutely perfect for him, because she was the same way, roping him into a fake engagement because she really, really liked him. 





~ Number Six ~

Kevin McCallister

Home Alone

House: Ravenclaw

For the first, maybe twenty minutes of the movie, Kevin is set up to be this helpless eight- year- old who panics at the thought of having to pack his own suitcase (to be fair, I probably wouldn't trust any eight- year- old to pack his own bags for an international trip). However, it becomes quickly apparent that Kevin is far from helpless. He's able to keep the house clean, go out shopping, ask if a toothbrush is approved by dentists, realize his own fears, and turn his house into a maze of traps within one hour. Good grief. I'm over twenty years old and most definitely can't do some of those things one the list. And he's eight. Eight. Kevin clearly has a very high IQ, and is selective about when he chooses to use it. I nominate him to go into the Department of Defense when he's older. No one would mess with our country if he was head of national security is all I'm saying. 





~ Number Five ~

Rudolph

Rudolph the Red- Nosed Reindeer

House: Gryffindor

It's hard being so glaringly different from others. Have you actually seen a picture of a real reindeer? They pretty much all look alike. Now, imagine one had a large, red nose that glowed bright. It would be shocking. In the film, Rudolph is belittled by his family and peers just for this, and it's understandable he'd want to leave them. This takes a good deal of courage, but it takes even more when he decides to return home to the same ones who mocked him. Of course, we all know how that story ended, with him coming out on top and the hero of the day. 





~ Number Four ~

Ebenezer Scrooge

A Christmas Carol

House: Slytherin

Scrooge's character is the one that has gone through the least amount of changes throughout the many, many adaptions of the story. This is actually the only Charles Dickens book I've ever finished. What's interesting about the story is it's theme; Scrooge is shown to be a miserable sinner, who doesn't need to be sympathized with. Instead of showing the world is as dark as Scrooge thinks, Dickens shows us just how beautiful the world, it's people, and Christmas can really be. Scrooge is a selfish old man, who has desires and ambitions. He's constantly searching for more and more. This doesn't really change by the end of the story, as he sets out feverishly determined to change his future and fix his mistakes. He's a tireless one, for sure, especially in his old age. 





~ Number Three ~

Grinch

How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

House: Ravenclaw

This was another hard one to place, as I originally wanted to place him in Slytherin. I'm still open to arguments, but I think he belongs more in Ravenclaw. Why? Well, he's a recluse that lives with his dog, for one, and though it's never showed he has any hobbies, he's clearly a planner and an engineer. He whips up a plan to ruin Whoville's Christmas literally within a couple hours, as well as sew his own outfit while staying true to the details. If he wasn't, he wouldn't have bothered with turning Max into a reindeer to keep the experience as authentic as possible. 





~ Number Two ~

Clara

The Nutcracker

House: Gryffindor

In my teenage years, I saw a few stage versions of this ballet. One was a professional play for Christmas, and the others starred a few of my close friends at the local high school. The music that accompanies this ballet have become some of the most recognizable scores in history, especially around Christmas time. There's no need for words, it's al told through music and dancing. And that's all you need to know about Clara. Becoming so small that you're the size of a mouse is scary enough, now throw in an attack by the Mouse King and his army and you have a true nightmare. However, Clara takes it all in stride, and is particularly thrilled when her beloved Nutcracker prince comes to life and whisks her away to a fantasy world. Sadly, I'm not sure this story really gets the treatment it deserves outside the ballet. 





~ Number One ~

Jack Skellington 

The Nightmare Before Christmas

House: Ravenclaw

Is it a Christmas movie, or a Halloween movie? Really, it's just personal preference, but for this list we'll slot it into Christmas movie. Jack is the bored skeleton king of Halloween town. How do you become bored in that town? If your brain is restlessly going 100mph at all times, of course. Jack literally sings a song called What's This? a song all about curiosity at something new. Of course, his true Ravenclaw shines through when, in trying to replicate Christmas, he spends days poring over books and trying to break Christmas down into a scientific formula. Only a bonkers, mad, curiosity- driven Ravenclaw would try and compress a holiday- nay, a feeling- down like that. 





And that's all for the rest of the year folks! My last official post of the year! There will be an announcement shortly, but as for posts, this was it. How did I do? Comment below what you thought! Have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, and I'll catch you all in 2021!

Signed,

TQ





Comments

  1. I love how you always get such a good mix of all of the houses! At first glance I would've thought that Buddy was a Hufflepuff, but you're right, he definitely has the gusto of a Gryffindor. Aha, Phil Davis is such a Slytherin! He knows how to manipulate, even if it includes pretending to fall down some stairs and limp around the yard to keep the general distracted. Good list of characters and perfect sorting!

    Oh, I will definitely be in for a month of Marvel! My sisters and I have been catching up on all of the movies, so it will all be really fresh for me. I hope that you have a Merry Christmas!

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